Viewing entries tagged
Culture

Make Someone Feel Special

Make Someone Feel Special

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
— –Maya Angelou
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Honduras: Culture

Honduras: Culture

HONDURAS CULTURE

The people of Honduras are very welcoming and hospitable.  Their culture is very open, and it's not uncommon to be invited (especially if you're on a mission trip there) into their home to relax and visit.  The people of Honduras appreciate when Americans come to the country.    

Firsthand Experience Quote: 

"Since the vast majority of Americans who go to Honduras are going to help improve the Hondurans' quality of life, the people are open and receptive to just about anyone coming from the U.S. This gives Americans a golden opportunity for evangelism and opportunities for discipleship."

Read More at Prepare My Mission 

The Missionary Heart

The Missionary Heart

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 “The missionary heart: Care more than some think is wise. Risk more than some think is safe. Dream more than some think is practical. Expect more than some think is possible. I was called not to comfort or success but to obedience….There is no joy outside of knowing Jesus and serving him.”

 

—Karen Watson, martyr, March 15, 2004

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In Honduras, the Garifuna are an “invisible” people

In Honduras, the Garifuna are an “invisible” people

Shared from an Article titled; Alternatives to detention leave some Honduran immigrants in "Shackles" - Latin America News Dispatch - LatinDispatch.com

When Eva left San Pedro Sula with her children this summer, she did not know what the journey would entail. A worker at a factory manufacturing shirts for Nike and Hanes, Eva had never traveled outside of Honduras. Some of her friends and family had moved to New York, but she rarely spoke to them.

Eva, Gabriel and Daria traveled to Guatemala by bus, where they stopped at a train station in the capital to beg for money. They then took a second bus to Mexico, before crossing the border into the U.S. by foot.

“I don’t like to talk about the experience,” Eva said. She was hesitant to share details about their migration, which culminated in a one-week detention at a facility in Texas before they were released and took a third bus to New York.

Pablo Blanco, a 38-year-old Garifuna who directs Elite Caribe International, a group that promotes Garifuna culture in the diaspora, said that many Garifuna women have been reluctant to open up about how and why they came to the U.S.

“A culture of fear has been instilled in these women, and now they don’t want to talk,” said Blanco, who has been attending the weekly meetings at Bronx Spanish Evangelical Church.

Garifuna from Honduras have been immigrating to the U.S. for decades. Around 1,000 women and children were part of the 88,491 Honduran migrants apprehended at the U.S. border between October 2013 and August 2014, according to Customs and Border Protection.

While Eva declined to discuss the reasons behind leaving, broad patterns affecting the Garifuna are clear. The Garifuna are not only fleeing violence in a country with the highest per capita homicide rate in the world, but also a government that has long marginalized their Afro-indigenous community.

Human traffickers known as “coyotes” facilitate the Garifuna migration, Garcia said, telling the women that if they travel to the U.S. with their children they will be allowed to stay in the country and work.

Carla Garcia addresses Garifuna during a community meeting at the Bronx Spanish Evangelical Church.

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez acknowledged the problem of coyotes in a July press release, and U.S. authorities have tried to counter the use of human traffickers through a Danger Awareness Campaign that includes billboards and radio announcements throughout Central America that explain that new arrivals will not be exempt from deportation.

Blanco said, however, that the Honduran government also helps perpetuate the problems that push the Garifuna to leave their homes. In Honduras, he said, the Garifuna occupy an “invisible” status, and the government routinely displaces members of the community who live on pristine coastal lands ideal for tourism projects. In one recent example, 400 Garifuna from the Barra Vieja community were evicted by members of Honduras National Police in September in order to clear territory for an Indura Beach and Resort development.

“In Honduras it’s like we’re discriminated twice,” Blanco said. “We’re black and indigenous.”

“The Garifuna came here because they thought it would be different and that they would be safe,” Garcia, the activist, said. “And instead they are treated like criminals.”

This is is an excerpt from an article published by the Latin America News Dispatch To read full article please Click Here 

3 Things I Learned From Julio Jn Gilles In Haiti

3 Things I Learned From Julio Jn Gilles In Haiti

1. In Haiti...You never Know 

Julio Jn Gilles and Javier Mendoza in Madeline Haiti

Julio Jn Gilles and Javier Mendoza in Madeline Haiti

This has become a familiar response while traveling through Haiti with Julio. I take this in a very positive way. He is keeping a gentle attitude about things that are out of his control. We try to control our schedules as best as we can.  We cross all of the t's and dot the i's but in Haiti, as in life, sometimes you just never know. That means don't sweat it and be content with where you are. Stay motivated, but realize that as much as you would like it to be, not everything is under your control. 

2. Compassion trumps Convention 

Pastor Julio’s compassion defies convention by providing much needed access to quality education for a group of children who will one day raise themselves out of poverty, and change the nation of Haiti.
— Javier Mendoza

Allowing things to stay "the way they've always been" is not only unacceptable it simply has no power in the eyes of Julio Jn Gilles. A son who grew up without his mother, practicing voodoo, and having no consistent place to lay his head at night, Julio knows first hand how for millions of people Past Predicts Future. Julio however had a different path because of the compassion of a missionary who saw it more fitting to send Julio to seminary than voodoo rituals. It's now the compassion of Jesus Christ that propels Julio's mission in life. He provides food for the needy and education for over 150 students every year. It is his compassion that allows the neediest ten percent of his student body to still attend school despite their inability to pay tuition. Pastor Julio's compassion defies convention by providing much needed access to quality education for a group of children who will one day raise themselves out of poverty, and change the nation of Haiti. 

3. Challenges will face Everyone but not everyone faces their challenges. 

Julio Jn Gilles is restoring dignity and hope to the nation of Haiti. 

Julio Jn Gilles is restoring dignity and hope to the nation of Haiti. 

Everyone has challenges but it's how we deal with our challenges that determine who we are. Our own personal challenges always seem like mountains to us because we see them up close. Not to say that our challenges aren't really challenging they are. I'm saying that there is always someone who has overcome a bigger challenge than us, at some point in history. Pastor Julio has helped me realize that how big or small a challenge seems, is largely in the eye of the beholder. We have the ultimate choice to either face our difficulties head on, or allow them to bury us in over our head. For someone who has faced dozens of challenges, Pastor Julio Jn Gilles in Haiti, has overcome and is overcoming them in a huge way. He leads a growing church that is near capacity every week, 6 grades of school, is raising a family of five, and finds joy in the fact that at one point in his life could not fathom a future for himself. 


Pastor Julio Jn Gilles

Pastor Julio Jn Gilles In Haiti displays an evident passion for God, and has compassion for people. 

Pastor Julio Jn Gilles In Haiti displays an evident passion for God, and has compassion for people. 

Pastor Julio Jn Gilles is a Haitien Pastor with a wonderful motivation to see his nation positively changed for good. From the voodoo rich culture, to hundreds of years of governmental corruption, to know the historical challenges still facing haiti, one can almost resolve to think that the country is beyond restoration. To hear Pastor Julio, however, is a different story. He recognizes the hurt that his nation has both endured and inflicted upon itself, and yet he remains dedicated to seeing positive change within his lifetime.
Growing up poor after his mother passed away when he was three, his father raised him to practice and partake in the country's voodoo religion. He struggled through school and was constantly living homeless and hungry, until one day a Christian missionary took him in and gave him a bed to sleep in and food to eat. The missionary helped restore his dignity and gave him hope for a future. That relationship led Julio to seminary and now some two decades later he has become a well respected Husband, Father, Pastor, School Director, and a Friend to everyone he crosses paths with.  
He has now made it his mission to restore dignity and hope to Haiti through his five children as well as through the primary school and church that he and his countless friends have built in Cap Haitien.
Please keep Pastor Julio In your prayers and consider partnering with him financially so he can confidently continue the amazing work he is doing.  

Refresh Others

Refresh Others

A generous person will prosper; whoever refreshes others will be refreshed.
— Proverbs 11:25 NIV
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